9 Common Misconceptions About Muscle

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9 Common Misconceptions About Muscle


Whether your goal is to build massive muscles or simply give your body more tone, you aren’t going to achieve either if you believe the misconceptions related to muscles. Here are nine of the most common:

  • You’ll get a bodybuilder’s physique if you lift heavier weights. The only way you’ll build that much muscle is to add supplements to your routine.
  • To build muscle, protein is the only nutrient that matters. The truth is that carbohydrates are important too, especially for energy.
  • You shouldn’t work out a muscle that is sore. Some soreness is natural if you’re pushing your physical limits, so if it’s just slight soreness, then it’s okay to work out.
  • You should always push your muscles to their max. Just as your cardio workouts should vary, with some days lighter, the same is true with your muscles so you don’t overwork them.
  • You have to eat every couple of hours to build your muscles. Yes, you likely need more calories if you’re engaging in grueling strength workouts, but not so often that you’re constantly munching.
  • You have to spend hours in the gym to see the results. You can get great results by choosing muscle-building workouts that provide faster results, such as HIIT training.
  • Exercise is more important to muscle growth than what you eat. If your muscles are under an inch of fat because of a poor diet, it doesn’t matter how fit they are. You won’t ever see them.
  • If you want to tone certain muscles, just focus on them. While a toned muscle does look better, you need to work all of your muscles for a symmetrical form and reduced risk of injury.
  • Muscle will make you gain weight versus lose. Muscle will actually help you lose fat because it takes more energy to support a pound of muscle than it does a pound of fat.

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