Eating Disorders – Society Pressure to be Thin

Posted by Rene Harwood on

 

There is overwhelming pressure in our civilisation to be thin. Thin is in (as they say), and countless young girls and women, and even some boys and men, are compromising their well-being to attempt to get there. The progression of an eating disorder usually goes through the periods of dieting, disordered eating and lastly a full-blown eating disorder. Individuals may start off by dieting to lose weight and become discouraged when the weight loss does not seem quick enough or noteworthy. This frustration, even desperation, causes them to curb their diet even further. When this does not go well in their perspective, they start to experiment with even more precarious disordered eating rituals such as the use of diuretics (a suppository that increases the rate of urination, hence intensifies water loss), self-induced vomiting, diet pills, food faddism (ingesting only one or a few particular foods or undertaking fad diets such as the grapefruit diet or the pineapple diet), abstaining, using saunas to sweat weight off, expelling food that has been masticated, and using purgatives or even enemas.Regrettably, these rituals do not work. Granting there may be a loss of weight conferring to the scale, the lost weight can be accredited to water loss and almost certainly lean tissue as opposed to fat. There is a large range in the regularity of disordered eating practices. Some people may participate occasionally in one of the techniques stated, while others may do so more than a few times a day. Participating in these disordered eating practices is the first step toward developing the eating disorders of anorexia nervosa and bulimia. The alarm is that individuals undertaking disordered eating practices can experience both the short- and long- term medical and mental conditions representative of individuals with anorexia and bulimia. These complications comprise low self-esteem, depression, heart difficulties, menstrual abnormalities, and may even result in death from heart failure or suicide. The earlier an individual seeks support, the better chance he or she has at averting and treating an eating disorder![1][2]

 

 

Bibliography

  1. Benardot, Dan. Advanced Sports Nutrition. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 2006.

 

  1. Earle, Roger W., and Thomas R. Baechle. NSCA's Essentials of Personal Training. 2nd ed. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 2012.

 



[1]Earle, Roger W., and Thomas R. Baechle. NSCA's Essentials of Personal Training. 2nd ed. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 2012.

[2]Benardot, Dan. Advanced Sports Nutrition. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 2006.