L Glutamine Supplement , What does it do ?

L Glutamine Supplement , What does it do ?

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Proteins are biological compounds consisting of a hereditarily dictated order of amino acids that function as the building blocks of protein. Amino acids are bound by peptide bonds sandwiched between the carboxyl and amino groups. That's why minuscule arrangements of amino acids are termed peptides. Proteins can be found in all cells of the body and are required to stimulate growth and to heal injured cells and tissue, along with a multiplicity of metabolic and hormonal undertakings. For instance, specific proteins function as chemical messengers that catalyse organic reactions in the body. Indeed, hormones are similarly proteins that impact metabolic action in several organs. Others serve important roles in cell-signalling practices, whereas others influence immunity function.

[1] There are twenty-two amino acids that are capable of being used to manufacture proteins. This incorporates eight essential amino acids (nine in babies) that must be assimilated from nourishment as the body cannot produce them. Without dietary sources of essential amino acids, the body will start devouring itself as a way to meet its essential amino acid needs. There are also seven conditionally essential amino acids. They are termed as such due to the fact that the body has problems synthesizing them competently, thus they naturally must be acquired from one’s diet if quantities are to be adequate.

[2] The remaining amino acids can be produced fairly effortlessly, and as such are considered ‘nonessential’. Glutamine is the most plentiful amino acid in the body, encompassing roughly sixty percent of the amino acid pools in muscles. Glutamine is at the top of the list for the most important single amino acids for aerobic endurance athletes. Extra glutamine is found in slow-twitch muscle, which advocates a superior requirement for this amino acid throughout aerobic endurance exercise. It is counted as a conditionally essential amino acid since it can be produced in the body; but,when under great physical strain, the need for glutamine surpasses the body’s skill at making it.

[3] Glutamine has a selection of functions in the body,counting cell development, proper immune function, and restoration from the damage caused by physical stress. Glutamine can be found in many different foods, ranging from vegetables (cabbage, corn, and spinach) to dairy products (yogurt, milk, and egg whites) to beef.

[4]Glutamine has also been used as a supplement, but the results are mostly insignificant. L-glutamine supplements have been found not to be of great help to athletes, or the general healthy individual. In certain cases, however, they can be used to help those that suffer from Chrohn’s disease, insomnia, depression/anxiety, and ulcerative colitis, while also relieving some pain from the effects of chemotherapy treatment for cancer

[5], in addition to the aforementioned benefit to aerobic endurance athletes.

Bibliography

  1. 1. Benardot, Dan. In Advanced Sports Nutrition. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 2006.
  2. Campbell, Bill I., and Marie A. Spano. NSCA's Guide to Sport and Exercise Nutrition. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 2011.
  3. Professional Guide to Diseases. 10th Edition. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2013.
  4. Wong, Cathy. "L-Glutamine - What You Need to Know." Alternative Medicine - Everything You Need to Know About Alternative Medicine. Web. 11 Mar. 2013. <http://altmedicine.about.com/od/herbsupplementguide/a/L-Glutamine.htm>.
  5. Campbell, Bill I., and Marie A. Spano. "Protein." In NSCA's Guide to Sport and Exercise Nutrition. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 2011. 33.

[2]Benardot, Dan. "Energy Nutrients." In Advanced Sports Nutrition. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 2006. 28.

[3]Campbell, Bill I., and Marie A. Spano. "Vitamins and Minerals, and Aerobic Endurance Supplements." In NSCA's Guide to Sport and Exercise Nutrition. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 2011. 111-113, 136.

[4] “Proteins: Anabolism." Professional Guide to Diseases. 10th Edition. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2013. 499-500.

[5]Wong, Cathy. "L-Glutamine - What You Need to Know." Alternative Medicine - Everything You Need to Know About Alternative Medicine. Web. 11 Mar. 2013. <http://altmedicine.about.com/od/herbsupplementguide/a/L-Glutamine.htm>.

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